Family Info and great history 

Letters sent home by Hubie

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First letter, sent via V-Mail to 

Mrs. A. R. Haunschild
204 West Linwood Blvd.
Kansas City  2 Missouri

Jan 9, 1945, France

Dearest Elda and Leona,
    How is the weather up in Kansas City?  Now we are out on the ocean.  The boat we have is really swell.  It is plenty warm.  We all had to go on the deck this morn.  Boy you should have seen the men throw up.  It really was a mess.  There sure are a lot of ‘em sea sick.  So far, I feel just fine.  I hope I stay that way.  The boat really rode good yesterday.  But it is getting rougher now.  We have very little to do.  We eat breakfast at 9:30 o’clock and supper at 6:30 o’clock.  We just eat two meals a day but that is all we need.  We sleep till 9 am.  I like that just fine.
    I think Verner is on this boat.  But I have not been able to find him.  I don’t know what unit he is in, so that makes it all the harder to find him.  I am hoping I will find him on the deck some time.  But that could just be luck.
    I sure have been doing a lot of traveling in the past three weeks.  If I would be a civilian, I could really have a swell time.  I never did get a pass while I was at Meade.  I just did not have time.  Don’t worry about me.  The Lord will protect me.  So long.


Love, 

Hubbie


Second letter sent via Vmail to:


Mrs. A. R. Haunschild
204 West Linwood Blvd.
Kansas City  2 Missouri


Jan 22, 1945

Dear Elda and Leona,  
     I am in France now.   I bet you think that Hub boy really gets around.  Well, since I left you, I have done lots of traveling.  Boy, these French trains are really slow.  I rode one for almost four days and nights and I did not go very far.   But at the same time, I did see a lot of country.  France sure has caught a lot of heck in this war.   One can’t imagine what it looks like till one sees it.  I sure am glad there is no bombing going on in the states.  I guess the people here really do have a tuff life, the way things look.  There are lot of French wearing wooden shoes.  I sure am glad that I know the folks at home don’t have to put up with anything like that.  The people at home aren’t thankful enough for the way they can live.  If I get back now I will be satisfied with most anything.
    The weather here is pretty cold and plenty snowy.  We have a foot of snow now and it snows almost every day.  But we have a barracks to live in.  It is not very good and not much heat.  But we manage to keep warm.  And our meals are pretty good.  But I would like for you to send me some candy and cookies if you please.  I am feeling fine  Don’t worry about me,

Your brother,

Hubbie

 
Third  letter, sent via V-Mail to 


Mrs. A. R. Haunschild
204 West Linwood Blvd.
Kansas City  2 Missouri

January 25, 1945, France


Dearest Elda,
    This makes two letters I have wrote you in two days. I guess that  is just not so bad. ha-ha.  Well, there is nothing to do here, but write and not much to write about.  So I am just trying to pass my time.  And I think this is a good way to pass it.
    What is Al doing now?  Is he still so busy?  Or did the people quit dying? ha-ha!  How is he and the draft coming along?  Fine, I hope.
    If there is anything you want to know just ask me questions.  I won’t ask for anymore boxes for a while cause when they catch up with me, I think have plenty for a while.  You may send me some air mail envelopes with six cent stamps on them.  I have plenty of paper.  If I get short on paper, I will ask for it.
    The chow is good here, and no work, so I am just fine.  As yet, I have received no mail.

Your brother,

Hubbie

 
Fourth letter, sent via V-Mail to 

Mrs. A. R. Haunschild
204 West Linwood Blvd.
Kansas City  2 Missouri

Feb 22, 1945, France

Dear Elda and Al,
    This is Thursday afternoon and a few hours till chow.  So I thought I would write you a few lines.  How is everything in Kansas City?  What is Al doing and is the draft Board letting him alone?  I hope they are.
    We have not got our mail for today.  I am hoping I will have some letter from home.   Some of the boys that came over the same time I did have received some mail.   So I am hoping I will get some today.  It has been almost two months since I have heard from anyone.
    Don’t send me any cigarettes, cause we get more here than I can smoke.  We get them free.  So don’t send me any.  So long Elda, I will write soon.

Loads of Love,

Hubbie



Fifth letter, sent via Airmail to 


Mrs. A. R. Haunschild
204 West Linwood Blvd.
Kansas City  2 Missouri

Feb 23, 1945, France

My dear sister,  (envelope addressed to Elda)
     After so long a time I did receive a letter from you that was the first and only letter I have received so far.  I sure was glad to get it.  Thank you very much.  It was the letter you wrote on Jan 11.  It was a V mail.  Maybe I will be getting more pretty soon.  Anyway, I hope.   It sure seems good to hear from home again.  Now if I get a box, I will be fixed for a good feast. Ha – ha.  Now don’t that just sound like Hub? Ha – ha.
    Yesterday they made me second in command of our squad.  I have to help the Sgt. Check the men in our squad to see that they have enough ammo, etc.  If I do a good job of it maybe some day I will get a rating.
    I am getting along just fine, better than I thought I would.  I sure was surprised today.  They told me I could go to rest camp tomorrow.  I will be there about five days.  And I won’t have anything to do.  They have dances and movies every day so that should really be life.  Oh yes, and they have showers so we can take a bath every day.
    If I don’t go to many dances, I will try and write you or Leona every day. How will that be?  That sure is a surprise to(o).  That they are letting me go already. I have just been with the company about a month.  Some of the boys here were here for three months before they got to go.  I guess I am just lucky.  But you know old Hub, he gets around.  The only thing I don’t like about going to rest camp is that I won’t get any mail till I get back to the my company.  But I guess I can wait five more days, cause I can use the rest.  Maybe I better tell you how this works. Every four days one man from our platoon get to go to rest camp.
    I was glad to hear that Al will get to stay till summer.  By that time I am sure the war will be over here by that time and then things will probably change a lot anyway.  I am praying that it will.  
    How is Leona by now?  Don’t let her worry about me.  I am just fine and I know the Lord will protect me w(h)ere ever I go.  You tell Leona to take good care of herself, so when I come home again we can go out and look the good old farm over
     You may wonder which letters here (are) faster V mail or Airmail.   Myself, I don’t know but all the other boys say airmail is the fastest.  So I think it would be best for you to write mostly air mail.
    I want to write the folks and Meta and Doris a letter yet tonight so maybe I better close.
    So long Elda and thank(s) for your sweet letter.  I am thinking of you always.

Love, your brother, 

Hubbie



Sixth letter, sent via Airmail to 

Mrs. A. R. Haunschild
204 West Linwood Blvd.
Kansas City  2 Missouri

March 1, 1945, France

Dearest Elda,

    I guess  you think it is about time I write to you.  This is Thursday morn. I am at rest camp.  I will be here till noon tomorrow.  It is about 9 o’clock.  I have just got done eating breakfast.  I bet you think I am really getting lazy.  This is the best rest I have had for a long time.  We are off the lines now but may go back any day.  But I hope we don’t.  Did you read any thing about Colmar in the papers?  I have been there.  If they had half as much in the papers at home as they did here, you probably read a plenty.
    Did I ever tell what division I am in?  I don’t know whether this will go through or not, but I will try it.  I am in the third division.  You probably have read a lot about it. It is the oldest division over here.  We have won many medal(s) of honor.  If I ever get home, I will be wearing lots of medals and ribbons.
    I suppose Leona has told you about my surprise meeting Chaplain Graptain (J. W. Grapatin).  I went up and talk (ed) with him last night.  I am going to take communion this afternoon.  That will be the first time I took communion since I left home.
    Ah yes, Elda  you asked me to send you a picture.  Well, when I was at Ft. Meade, I did not have time to do anything and now I don’t know if I ever will have a chance.  Some of the boys do have a camera.  I may have them to take my picture some day and I will send it to you.
    Say you may tell Leona I am combing my hair straight back now.  She tried to get me to do that when I was home, but I never would.  But now I am.  Just why, I don’t know myself. Just to be different I guess, ha ha.  I have not received any mail since I left the co.  I hope I have a nice big stack when I get back.

So long Elda,

Your brother, Hubbie


Seventh letter, sent via V-Mail to 

Mrs. A. R. Haunschild
204 West Linwood Blvd.
Kansas City  2 Missouri

March 12, 1945, France

Dearest Elda and Leona,
    I will try and answer your letters.  I had twenty three last Thursday.  Boy, I was really busy trying to read all of them.  I hope I get them more regular now, since I have my new address.
    I still have not had a chance to have my picture taking.  If I ever have a chance, I will send you one.
    I had three letters today from Martin Mattlage.  I guess I have been in about the same places he was.  I sure wish I could talk to you again.  I could tell you a lot.  Maybe it won’t be too long till I get back.  I could tell you some thing that would make your hair stand straight up. Ha ha. I will try and write to Leona tomorrow night.  Thanks for your sweet letters.

Your brother,

Loads of Love,

Hubbie



Hubie was killed in battle on March 15, 1945 in Utweiler, Germany.